Little Logic in This Ethanol Support

September 21, 2008

In an interview with green2tech

 

10 Questions for Poet’s CEO Jeff Broin « Earth2Tech.jpg


from: Earth2Tech
(click image for full story online)

 

Jeff Broin of ethanol producer Poet said the following

8). In the great debate over how much corn ethanol is affecting food prices, what do you think about some newer reports that have said biofuels have affected food prices significantly?
Every study depends on the assumptions of its author, and the opponents of renewable fuels have been able to generate a few that say what they want. Almost every independent study I’ve seen has said that ethanol production has had a very small impact on the consumer’s price for food, especially in comparison to the impact of rising energy prices.

A study from the Agricultural and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M said, “The underlying force driving changes in the agricultural industry, along with the economy as a whole, is overall higher energy costs, evidenced by $100 per barrel oil.” Just do the math. A semi can haul 4,200 boxes of corn flakes at a time, and with 10 ounces of corn in each box, that’s a total of 46.9 bushels of corn. At a $6 bushel, the corn in all 4,200 boxes has a value of $281.40. To haul those boxes 1,500 miles, however, would cost $881.25 with diesel priced at $4.70 per gallon. That means it takes 21 cents of diesel per box to get it to the store, yet the value of corn in that box is less than seven cents. What do you think is the real driver of higher food prices?

But this study surely has nothing to say about biofuels not pushing up the price of food? In fact what would the fuel cost have been if the truck was run on biodiesel?

Its also flawed in that the calculation is for $100 crude & $ 4.70 / gallon diesel – even at $50 crude and the corresponding diesel price of $ 2.86 / gallon (extrapolated from GasBuddy data) the diesel cost is still 13 cents. This is a of food retail and consumer demands not fuel costs!

 

Gas Price Historical Price Charts - GasBuddy.com.jpg


from: GasBuddy
(click image for full story online)

 

Lets not even start calculating the packaging cost and the wholesale and retail margins!

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Biogas in Californian Dairies

September 16, 2008

This presentation on the potential of biogas production from dairy waste in California is interesting and presents some useful data.


Challenges to Biogas Production and Use on California s Dairy Farms – Get more Legal Forms

I am able to email you this document if you require, please click here and leave the embedded text in the subject line.


The 3Rs of Pollution Prevention

September 16, 2008

This document by The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control identifies Reduce, Reuse and Recycle as the path to reducing pollution from Food Processing.

This simple document makes one think of what goes in in the process and is worth a quick read. Reducing inputs of course reduces product cost and waste and in my opinion is the preferred approach. Recycling and Reusing are reactive measures and have associated with them the waste of energy and water resulting from repeat processing.


A Pollution Prevention Guide for Food Processors

I am able to email you this document if you require please email me here with 3Rs in the subject line.


WASTE – Food, Energy, Water & Time

September 16, 2008

I have for a long time worried and talked about waste and the attention it deserves when considering nutrition in Africa.

In the past I focussed on the food which could have been available for the poor and malnourished if it hadn’t been lost and on reusing for other purposed if it couldn’t be used as food.

But now a few reports have made me come to see that this is much wider context. The first by the UK’s Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) quantified the household waste of food in the UK.

http___www.wrap.org.uk_downloads_The_Food_We_Waste_v2__2_.27e2ea28.pdf.jpg

from: WRAP
(click image for full story online)

 

This report finds that 28% of the mass and 32% of the value of all food bought in the UK is wasted.

While this is important to the UK food chain it also effects the rest of the world as the food chains runs back to the farm, maybe in Africa where 30% too much energy, water and labour have been used satisfying the UK food market!

MORE ON THIS OVER THE NEXT WHILE!